El Paso Police Department Salary - ViassildNews

El Paso Police Department Salary

El Paso Police Department Salary

El Paso Police Department Salary – Images from El Paso, Texas, police attacking the Olgin family. Screenshots of camera phone images taken by Adzary Olgin.

The story of an El Paso family’s heartbreaking encounter with police shows how treacherous it can be when we point our cameras at police. The couple has been speaking to family members, which they did when police decided to arrest them during a violent raid on their home. We delve into police records and examine video evidence that shows how law enforcement can retaliate when cameras are pointed at them.

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El Paso Police Department Salary

. As I have always made clear, this program has a simple goal: hold the politically powerful police force accountable. And for this reason we not only pay attention to the bad behavior of certain police officers. Instead, we study the system that makes bad policing possible. And today we’re going to demonstrate that goal by showing you this video of the arrest of an El Paso family whose crime was, wait for it, trying to help a family member who was being attacked. But instead they found their home broken into.

Board & Staff

But before we begin, I want you to know that if you have evidence of police misconduct, email it to us at par@ and like, share and comment on our videos. You know I read your comments and although I don’t always get a response to your comments, I really do read them and appreciate them. And of course, you can always contact me directly on Twitter or Facebook @tayasbaltimore. And if you can, click the Patreon donation link posted in the comments below because we have some extra goodies for our PAR family there.

Now, usually on a show, before I tell a story, I like to start with a brief synopsis. This means I make a claim about police power and then back it up with a concrete example. In journalism we call this going from the general to the specific, or better yet, showing instead of telling. But today, the story I am going to tell you may be too strange to stick to this format. This is the story of a family who tried to film the police and ended up with their home invaded by not one or two, but six police officers from El Paso, Texas. That’s right, the family used the cell phone to exercise their constitutional rights, but instead, they were arrested, brutalized, and faced serious charges.

As you will see in the video we are going to show you, a father and his high school daughter were arrested simply for trying to record a police encounter in a respectful and legal manner. So instead of using this case to make a broader point about police, I’ll do something I’ve never done before on this show: ask you, our viewers, for help. Please help me tell their story as much as possible to protect this family.

But first, let me present the facts. The encounter began after a relative of the family called the police after his father was allegedly attacked. For his own safety, the victim asked his family to record his interactions with the police, so Adjari and his sister, and shortly after, Eddie’s father, went two blocks from their house to Eddie’s property and began to engrave. . We’ll see.

This Week’s Most Wanted Fugitives From El Paso Police, El Paso County Sheriff’s Office

Speaker 1: I’m calling because I was trying to get away from him so he wouldn’t hit me. Because I knew it, I felt like he was hitting me. And he grabbed my ankle and hit me at that moment. And I kicked him and tried to scratch his face, but I couldn’t…

Taya Graham: One of the officers on the scene seemed completely unaware of the footage. But another officer told the family that police recording was illegal and a form of interference. Have a look.

Police Officer 1: You can stay there. Can you save it or I will remove it from [inaudible].

Adzari Olgin: D. González and three… Wow, wow. You can not do that. Everything is in my hands… You just grabbed my phone and attacked me.

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Police Officer 1: Out of anxiety, I suggest you leave now. Do you want to get arrested or blown up for anxiety? Your choice.

Officer 1: Because we are investigating, ma’am, and I asked you to keep her phone because we are investigating a case of domestic violence.

Two Deadly Force Lawsuits Against The City And El Paso Police Remain Pending, Following Settlement Of Two Others

Police Officer 1: Do you want to get arrested for trespassing or do you want to fly?

Taya Graham: Now, although the interpretation of the intervention or the victim’s privacy in this case is questioned because the interview took place in a public place, outside the building, the focus of this case is what happened next. This is because both Adzari and his father obeyed the officer’s order to stop filming and left the building, as can be seen here.

Eddie Olgin: Leave us alone. Let’s be alone. Get out of here. [inaudible]. Damn to the children. What happened to you? What happened?

Taya Graham: But about 45 minutes later, not one, not two, but six El Paso police officers showed up at his house in full gear. And it wasn’t just a few curious agents who wanted to interview the family about what they witnessed. No, it was an actual tactical team that invaded the house, assaulted, and then violently captured both Adzari and Eddie. watch [pause during playback]

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Unfortunately, the brutal arrest was just the beginning of the entire family’s ordeal. The reason is that the prosecution has not yet proceeded with the case. Adzari and his father were charged with seven different crimes. And to know how it has affected them and what the consequences are for them, I will soon join the family. But first, I want to talk to my reporting partner Stephen Janis, who is investigating this matter and reached out for comment. Esteban, thanks for joining me.

Taya Graham: First, as I mentioned at the beginning of the program, the right to record police officers performing their duties in public is broadly covered by the First Amendment. What does the law say in Texas?

Stephen Janis: Well, the law doesn’t say anything about that. This has been controversial because they are trying to legislate this at the local level, but generally, the First Amendment and any federal law is the governing law on the matter. It’s not really a question of whether it’s legal or not. This is legal. And while some cities have tried, as we previously reported in Texas, to create exceptions for police in some way, this is what happened in Oklahoma: They can’t search police. an employee who fulfills his public duty.

Taya Graham: Then the family left the scene. How do El Paso police explain the need to search your home?

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Steven Janis: Well, I sent a very detailed email to the El Paso police with many questions, including this one. I also left you the video, the video of the family cell phone of the scene. They told me they couldn’t open the link for security reasons and said here is a link to the IID appeal form if the family wants to fill it out, but they didn’t respond or specifically address me. What they told me was to read this statement, this is the explanation. And if you read this statement like I did, there really is no explanation.

There is no explanation why the police felt they had to follow them home or conduct a raid. There is a law called “new harassment” that gives officers the right to enter a home or chase someone without a warrant. But usually it’s a crime or something serious, like shooting someone. Not always, not always. So I think it’s really stupid that the police department can’t give me an explanation for why it was so important that the officers came back 45 minutes later and what they did to this family.

Stephen Janis: Well, I sent them a very similar email and asked them why they are pursuing this case and what the legal basis is. They emailed me and said if you want to file a Freedom of Information Act request, here is the link. And I want, guys, I ask you to justify this accusation. So far they have not reacted.

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    1. El Paso Police Department Salary. As I have always made clear, this program has a simple goal: hold the politically powerful police force accountable. And for this reason we not only pay attention to the bad behavior of certain police officers. Instead, we study the system that makes bad policing possible. And today we're going to demonstrate that goal by showing you this video of the arrest of an El Paso family whose crime was, wait for it, trying to help a family member who was being attacked. But instead they found their home broken into.Board & StaffBut before we begin, I want you to know that if you have evidence of police misconduct, email it to us at par@ and like, share and comment on our videos. You know I read your comments and although I don't always get a response to your comments, I really do read them and appreciate them. And of course, you can always contact me directly on Twitter or Facebook @tayasbaltimore. And if you can, click the Patreon donation link posted in the comments below because we have some extra goodies for our PAR family there.Now, usually on a show, before I tell a story, I like to start with a brief synopsis. This means I make a claim about police power and then back it up with a concrete example. In journalism we call this going from the general to the specific, or better yet, showing instead of telling. But today, the story I am going to tell you may be too strange to stick to this format. This is the story of a family who tried to film the police and ended up with their home invaded by not one or two, but six police officers from El Paso, Texas. That's right, the family used the cell phone to exercise their constitutional rights, but instead, they were arrested, brutalized, and faced serious charges.As you will see in the video we are going to show you, a father and his high school daughter were arrested simply for trying to record a police encounter in a respectful and legal manner. So instead of using this case to make a broader point about police, I'll do something I've never done before on this show: ask you, our viewers, for help. Please help me tell their story as much as possible to protect this family.But first, let me present the facts. The encounter began after a relative of the family called the police after his father was allegedly attacked. For his own safety, the victim asked his family to record his interactions with the police, so Adjari and his sister, and shortly after, Eddie's father, went two blocks from their house to Eddie's property and began to engrave. . We'll see.This Week's Most Wanted Fugitives From El Paso Police, El Paso County Sheriff's OfficeSpeaker 1: I'm calling because I was trying to get away from him so he wouldn't hit me. Because I knew it, I felt like he was hitting me. And he grabbed my ankle and hit me at that moment. And I kicked him and tried to scratch his face, but I couldn't...Taya Graham: One of the officers on the scene seemed completely unaware of the footage. But another officer told the family that police recording was illegal and a form of interference. Have a look.Police Officer 1: You can stay there. Can you save it or I will remove it from [inaudible].Adzari Olgin: D. González and three... Wow, wow. You can not do that. Everything is in my hands... You just grabbed my phone and attacked me.El Paso Shooting: 20 Dead, At Least 26 Wounded; Suspect Will Be Charged With Hate CrimeJoin thousands of people who rely on our journalism to solve complex problems, uncover hidden truths and challenge the status quo with our free newsletter delivered straight to your inbox twice a week:Join thousands of people who support our nonprofit journalism and help us deliver news and analysis you can't get anywhere else:Police Officer 1: Out of anxiety, I suggest you leave now. Do you want to get arrested or blown up for anxiety? Your choice.Officer 1: Because we are investigating, ma'am, and I asked you to keep her phone because we are investigating a case of domestic violence.Two Deadly Force Lawsuits Against The City And El Paso Police Remain Pending, Following Settlement Of Two OthersPolice Officer 1: Do you want to get arrested for trespassing or do you want to fly?Taya Graham: Now, although the interpretation of the intervention or the victim's privacy in this case is questioned because the interview took place in a public place, outside the building, the focus of this case is what happened next. This is because both Adzari and his father obeyed the officer's order to stop filming and left the building, as can be seen here.Eddie Olgin: Leave us alone. Let's be alone. Get out of here. [inaudible]. Damn to the children. What happened to you? What happened?Taya Graham: But about 45 minutes later, not one, not two, but six El Paso police officers showed up at his house in full gear. And it wasn't just a few curious agents who wanted to interview the family about what they witnessed. No, it was an actual tactical team that invaded the house, assaulted, and then violently captured both Adzari and Eddie. watch [pause during playback]Ex West Texas Police Officer Who Helped Stepfather Deal Cocaine Learns Her PunishmentUnfortunately, the brutal arrest was just the beginning of the entire family's ordeal. The reason is that the prosecution has not yet proceeded with the case. Adzari and his father were charged with seven different crimes. And to know how it has affected them and what the consequences are for them, I will soon join the family. But first, I want to talk to my reporting partner Stephen Janis, who is investigating this matter and reached out for comment. Esteban, thanks for joining me.Taya Graham: First, as I mentioned at the beginning of the program, the right to record police officers performing their duties in public is broadly covered by the First Amendment. What does the law say in Texas?Stephen Janis: Well, the law doesn't say anything about that. This has been controversial because they are trying to legislate this at the local level, but generally, the First Amendment and any federal law is the governing law on the matter. It's not really a question of whether it's legal or not. This is legal. And while some cities have tried, as we previously reported in Texas, to create exceptions for police in some way, this is what happened in Oklahoma: They can't search police. an employee who fulfills his public duty.Taya Graham: Then the family left the scene. How do El Paso police explain the need to search your home?Courageous Women Of El Paso Police: Tribute On International Women's Day