El Paso Police Department Records - ViassildNews

El Paso Police Department Records

El Paso Police Department Records

El Paso Police Department Records – Still images of El Paso, Texas, police confronting the Holguin family. Screenshot taken from phone camera image courtesy of Adzari Holguin.

The story of an El Paso family’s terrifying encounter with police shows just how treacherous it can be when we point our cameras at law enforcement. PAR spoke to family members who were doing so when the police decided to arrest them when their home was burglarized. We examine police records and examine video evidence that shows how law enforcement can retaliate if a camera is pointed at them.

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El Paso Police Department Records

. As I explained, this event had one purpose: to deter a politically powerful police organization. And in doing so, we don’t focus on the bad behavior of individual police officers. Instead, we examine the system that makes bad policing possible. And today we accomplish this goal by showing you this video that shows the arrest of an El Paso crime family that – wait for it – is trying to help everyone who was attacked. But on the contrary, they are in trouble because their home is invaded.

Chief Of Police Greg Allen’s Funeral Services To Be Held Today

But before we begin, I want to let you know that if you have evidence of police misconduct, please email us privately at par@ And please like, share and comment our videos. You know I read your comments, and even though I don’t always respond to your comments, I really do read them and appreciate them. And you can always reach me directly @tayasbaltimore on Twitter or Facebook. And if you can, please hit the Patreon donation link posted in the comments below, because we’ve got more for our PAR family.

Now, usually before I tell a story in a program, I like to open it with a short thesis. That means I’m going to make a statement about police powers and back it up with an example. In journalism we call this the general to the specific, or better yet show, not tell. But today, the story I’m about to tell you might be too weird to stick to that format. It’s the story of a family who tries to film the police and ends up having their home raided by not one, but six El Paso, Texas police officers. That’s right, the family used their cell phones to exercise their constitutional rights, but instead found themselves in jail, facing brutal and serious charges.

As you can see in the video we’re showing today, a father and his high school daughter are watching jail time for trying to film a police encounter in a respectful and legal manner. So instead of using this case to make a big deal about the police, I’m going to do something I’ve never done before on this show: I’m asking you, our viewers, for help. Please help me to take care of this family as much as possible to save them.

But first, let me give you proof. The dispute started when the family members complained to the police that the father had beaten him. To be safe, the victim asked his relatives to record his conversation with the police, so Azari and his sister, and some time later his father, Eddie, walked two blocks from their house to Eddie’s employer’s place and began. . to register. Let’s see.

Board & Staff

Speaker 1: I called him because I was trying to get away from him so he wouldn’t hit me. Because I know, I feel like he’s going to hit me. And he grabbed my ankle and that’s when he hit me. And I kicked him and I tried to scratch his face, but I couldn’t—

Taya Graham: One of the officers at the scene was completely oblivious to the recording. However, another police officer told the family members that police filming was illegal and disturbing. look

Officer 1: You can stay there. You can keep it or I’ll take [inaudible].

Azari Holguin: d. Gonzalez and three… ouch, ouch. You can’t do that. It was all mine… He grabbed my phone from my hand and physically tortured me.

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Officer 1: [INAUDIBLE] Interrupting, I suggest you leave now. Are you going to be arrested for harassment or stripping? Choose yourself.

Officer 1: We are investigating ma’am, and I asked you to please put your phone down because we are investigating a case of domestic violence.

Officers Shouldn’t Work More Than 12 Hour Shifts. El Paso’s Are Putting In 16 Hours Regularly

Policeman 1: Want to arrest you or undress you?

Taya Graham: Now, even if the definition of interference in this case or the privacy of the victim is called into question because the interview took place in public, outside, what happened next is the crux of this case. Azari and his father obeyed authorities’ orders to stop filming and leave the scene, as you can see here.

Eddie Holguin: Leave us alone. Leave us alone. Download it here. [inaudible]. Babysitters. what is your problem What are the things?

Taya Graham: But about 45 minutes later, not one, not two, but six El Paso police officers in full gear showed up at their house. And it’s not just some curious officers who want to talk to families about what they saw. No, it was actually a tactical team that stormed the house, stormed it, and captured Adjari and Eddie. Staring. [Pause while movie plays]

Safety And Security / Sble Program

Unfortunately, the brutal prison is just the beginning of trouble for the entire family. That’s because prosecutors are still pushing the case forward. Azari and his father were charged with seven separate offences. And to find out how this affects them and what consequences they face, I will soon join the family. But first, I want to talk to my reporting partner, Stephen Janis, who has seen the case and is trying to comment. Thanks for joining me, Stephen.

Taya Graham: So first of all, as I discussed at the beginning of the show, the right to record police officers performing their duties in a public place is pretty much covered by the First Amendment. What is the law in Texas?

Stephen Janis: Well, the law doesn’t say anything about that. It was controversial because they tried to legalize it at the local level, but generally, the First Amendment and federal law are the governing laws in this case. So, it is not a question whether it is legal or not. It is legal. And if other cities have tried, as we’ve reported before in Texas, they’ve tried in some way to exempt the police, which happened in Oklahoma, when, of course, it’s not in the Constitution to tell anybody that they can. Not recording. A police officer is doing his public duty.

Taya Graham: So the family left the scene. How did the El Paso police explain the need to raid his home?

Rogue Officers Bounce Between Communities, Often With Few Consequences

Stephen Janis: Yes, I sent the El Paso police a detailed email with several questions, including that question. I also sent an email with a video, a cell phone video of the family leaving the scene. They told me they can’t open the link for security reasons and they said here is the link to the IID complaint form if the family wants to fill it, but they didn’t respond or talk directly. The explanation is what they told me to read the affidavit. And if you read the affidavit that I did, there’s really no explanation.

There was no explanation as to why the police felt they had to follow the family home or to the attack. There is a law called fresh pursuit that gives officers the right to break into homes or detain someone without a warrant. But usually it’s a serious crime or as bad as shooting someone. Not always, not always. So I think it’s pretty stupid why the police department couldn’t come back 45 minutes later and explain what they did to this family.

Stephen Janis: Well, I sent the same email and asked why they’re pursuing this lawsuit, what’s the legal basis? They emailed me saying that if you want to file a Freedom of Information Act request, here is the link. And I was like, hey, guys, please excuse the trouble. So far they have not responded.

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    1. El Paso Police Department Records. As I explained, this event had one purpose: to deter a politically powerful police organization. And in doing so, we don't focus on the bad behavior of individual police officers. Instead, we examine the system that makes bad policing possible. And today we accomplish this goal by showing you this video that shows the arrest of an El Paso crime family that - wait for it - is trying to help everyone who was attacked. But on the contrary, they are in trouble because their home is invaded.Chief Of Police Greg Allen's Funeral Services To Be Held TodayBut before we begin, I want to let you know that if you have evidence of police misconduct, please email us privately at par@ And please like, share and comment our videos. You know I read your comments, and even though I don't always respond to your comments, I really do read them and appreciate them. And you can always reach me directly @tayasbaltimore on Twitter or Facebook. And if you can, please hit the Patreon donation link posted in the comments below, because we've got more for our PAR family.Now, usually before I tell a story in a program, I like to open it with a short thesis. That means I'm going to make a statement about police powers and back it up with an example. In journalism we call this the general to the specific, or better yet show, not tell. But today, the story I'm about to tell you might be too weird to stick to that format. It's the story of a family who tries to film the police and ends up having their home raided by not one, but six El Paso, Texas police officers. That's right, the family used their cell phones to exercise their constitutional rights, but instead found themselves in jail, facing brutal and serious charges.As you can see in the video we're showing today, a father and his high school daughter are watching jail time for trying to film a police encounter in a respectful and legal manner. So instead of using this case to make a big deal about the police, I'm going to do something I've never done before on this show: I'm asking you, our viewers, for help. Please help me to take care of this family as much as possible to save them.But first, let me give you proof. The dispute started when the family members complained to the police that the father had beaten him. To be safe, the victim asked his relatives to record his conversation with the police, so Azari and his sister, and some time later his father, Eddie, walked two blocks from their house to Eddie's employer's place and began. . to register. Let's see.Board & StaffSpeaker 1: I called him because I was trying to get away from him so he wouldn't hit me. Because I know, I feel like he's going to hit me. And he grabbed my ankle and that's when he hit me. And I kicked him and I tried to scratch his face, but I couldn't—Taya Graham: One of the officers at the scene was completely oblivious to the recording. However, another police officer told the family members that police filming was illegal and disturbing. lookOfficer 1: You can stay there. You can keep it or I'll take [inaudible].Azari Holguin: d. Gonzalez and three… ouch, ouch. You can't do that. It was all mine... He grabbed my phone from my hand and physically tortured me.El Paso K 9 Featured On 'live Pd' RetiresJoin thousands of people who rely on our journalism to navigate complex issues, uncover hidden truths, and challenge the status quo with our free newsletter, delivered directly to your inbox twice a week:Join the thousands of people who support our nonprofit journalism and help us deliver news and analysis you won't find anywhere else:Officer 1: [INAUDIBLE] Interrupting, I suggest you leave now. Are you going to be arrested for harassment or stripping? Choose yourself.Officer 1: We are investigating ma'am, and I asked you to please put your phone down because we are investigating a case of domestic violence.Officers Shouldn't Work More Than 12 Hour Shifts. El Paso's Are Putting In 16 Hours RegularlyPoliceman 1: Want to arrest you or undress you?Taya Graham: Now, even if the definition of interference in this case or the privacy of the victim is called into question because the interview took place in public, outside, what happened next is the crux of this case. Azari and his father obeyed authorities' orders to stop filming and leave the scene, as you can see here.Eddie Holguin: Leave us alone. Leave us alone. Download it here. [inaudible]. Babysitters. what is your problem What are the things?Taya Graham: But about 45 minutes later, not one, not two, but six El Paso police officers in full gear showed up at their house. And it's not just some curious officers who want to talk to families about what they saw. No, it was actually a tactical team that stormed the house, stormed it, and captured Adjari and Eddie. Staring. [Pause while movie plays]Safety And Security / Sble ProgramUnfortunately, the brutal prison is just the beginning of trouble for the entire family. That's because prosecutors are still pushing the case forward. Azari and his father were charged with seven separate offences. And to find out how this affects them and what consequences they face, I will soon join the family. But first, I want to talk to my reporting partner, Stephen Janis, who has seen the case and is trying to comment. Thanks for joining me, Stephen.Taya Graham: So first of all, as I discussed at the beginning of the show, the right to record police officers performing their duties in a public place is pretty much covered by the First Amendment. What is the law in Texas?Stephen Janis: Well, the law doesn't say anything about that. It was controversial because they tried to legalize it at the local level, but generally, the First Amendment and federal law are the governing laws in this case. So, it is not a question whether it is legal or not. It is legal. And if other cities have tried, as we've reported before in Texas, they've tried in some way to exempt the police, which happened in Oklahoma, when, of course, it's not in the Constitution to tell anybody that they can. Not recording. A police officer is doing his public duty.Taya Graham: So the family left the scene. How did the El Paso police explain the need to raid his home?Rogue Officers Bounce Between Communities, Often With Few Consequences